Correlated Electrons at the Nanoscale

The Hoffman lab combines molecular beam epitaxy and scanning probe microscopy to understand and control the nanoscale electronic and magnetic properties of exotic materials.


MBE-grown FeSe
first FeSe
Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2
Ba(Fe<sub>1-x</sub>Co<sub>x</sub>)<sub>2</sub>As<sub>2</sub>
NdFeAsO1-xFx
NdFeAsO<sub>1-x</sub>F<sub>x</sub>
PrxCa1-xFe2As2
Pr<sub>x</sub>Ca<sub>1-x</sub>Fe<sub>2</sub>As<sub>2</sub>
Bi2Sr2CuO6+x Bi-2201
Bi2Se3
Bi<sub>2</sub>Se<sub>3</sub>
Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x Bi-2212 Sb(111)
Sb(111)
VO2
VO<sub>2</sub>
Nd2Fe14B
Nd<sub>2</sub>Fe<sub>14</sub>B
SmB6
SmB<sub>6</sub>
KxSr1-xFe2As2
K<sub>x</sub>Sr<sub>1-x</sub>Fe<sub>2</sub>As<sub>2</sub>
Li0.9Mo6O17
Li<sub>0.9</sub>Mo<sub>6</sub>O<sub>17</sub>
La2SrMn2O7
La<sub>2-2x</sub>Sr<sub>1+2x</sub>Mn<sub>2</sub>O<sub>7</sub>
NbSe2
NbSe<sub>2</sub>

In fall 2015, the Hoffman Lab will move to the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, in order to expand both the SPM and MBE capabilities of the group.